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This is SO exciting!! You have been been waiting patiently (well, kind of) for so long to finally hold your new pup! You've watched the 10 second videos hundreds of times and showed your friends pictures like a proud parent. And today is the day!!

* PICK UP DAY!

You get choked up, eyes starting to water, finally holding your baby in your arms. She's so cute and sweet and a little nervous, but soon starts to warm up, licking your nose and cheeks. You've never been so happy (ok, wedding day, kids, sure; but this is a NEW PUPPY!!)! After a few minutes she settles in and is excited to be with her new Forever Family. You grab her from your child's arms (she is YOUR pup, after all) and snuggle into her soft fur, smelling the wonderful puppy breath. Then, WHAM!! Like a tiny, fluffy shark attack, she clamps down on your nose with dagger-like fangs. Your eyes start to water again, for a whole different reason than before, as she bites your nostril, teeth penetrating right through the sensitive membrane. You struggle mightily not to drop a few choice expletives. HOLY CRAP! You forgot about the teeth! After prying her from your face, pushing her into your kid's arms (it is THEIR puppy, after all!) you pull some kleenex from your pocket, staunch the flow of blood and wipe your eyes. You angrily look down at her as she nervously looks up at you, then your heart melts all over again. You gently pick her up, pointing the bitey parts away from your scarred nose, and snuggle back into the soft, warm fur, so happy to have her as a part of your life.


* WHY DOES SHE DO IT??

Nipping and biting is a completely normal behavior for pups, as this is how they play with each other. They don't have hands, so they use their mouths. They love to play and roughhouse, grabbing chunks of fur and wrestling with siblings and Mom. It's sometimes hard to remember that as we snuggle and play with them, but it's always been perfectly normal and acceptable for them. Until now. She begins to learn how rough she can play the last couple weeks with their siblings. They and Mom will let her know when enough is enough.





*SO NOW WHAT DO I DO (beside stocking up on Band Aids)?

There are different things that can be done to help curtail this behavior so that you and they have a happy life, with less bloodletting. First and foremost, DON'T HIT and DON'T YELL (well, after your initial non-PG13 outburst). Here are some better options:

  1. Learn 'Em Up: We start working with your pups in our homes before they go home to you, but you will want to continue their education. We always recommend additional training and taking your pup to a Basic Training class will teach you (yes, you) and your puppy ways to overcome bad habits. Training will develop confidence in your pup and help to reinforce positive behaviors.

  2. "OUCH!!": Your pup understands your emotions and can tell when you're upset or hurt. When they are still with their siblings and they take it too far, a yelp will let them know to dial it down a notch or two. Even a sudden intake of breath will alert them that something's not right. Through this they will learn Bite Inhibition. Just make sure you only do this when it hurts, and not when they are just "mouthing" you, which is ok.

  3. "You Don't Bite Me, I Won't Bite You!": What could be more fun than rolling a round on the floor with a fluffy little bouncy ball of fur?! Well, I can tell what's not fun: Going to work for a week with one of those little round Band Aids on your nose. The ones that are supposed to match your skin, but don't, so everyone in the Office sees it and asks what happened and you have to explain that you're not quite the Master Puppy Trainer that you've been telling them you are. Sorry, a little side rant... Anywho, as fun as it is to roughhouse with our pups, until they learn bite inhibition, it's best to keep it more low-key and find other ways to play. Saying things like "Calm Down" or "Settle", in a soothing voice, will help them to understand that things are getting a little too wild.

  4. "Oh No You Didn't!": When things get a little crazy, which they inevitably will, and the land shark won't stop attacking, just getting up and walking away will let her know that playtime is over. When you walk away and she keeps nipping at your heels, stop, taking away the thrill of the chase. Just ignore her. Take another step. If she bites, stop again. When she gets it, and doesn't bite, shower her with loud, excited, happy praise. Make her want that praise again, more than anything else in the world! When you ignore or disengage, it's just not as much fun.

  5. Retail Therapy: At a young age, it may not be reasonable to expect her to just forget the yummy goodness that are your ankles. Might be time to mix in some playthings. Distraction is an excellent tool with puppies, as it is with toddlers! Every dog is different, so we always recommend going with inexpensive toys to start, until you find the ones that she loves, then upgrade. I don't know how many times we bought expensive gifts for our little kids, or grandson, only to find that they prefer the box it's wrapped in... When she starts to bite, point the bitey parts away from you and hand her a toy. Works like a charm!

  6. Puppy Play Time: One of the best ways to help your pup to improve this behavior is to put her back where she started: playing with other puppies. Dogs are great at setting boundaries, and puppies are the same. Always supervise the visit so things don't get out of hand. You want to be very careful with several considerations when setting up play dates: 1. Make sure the pups are about the same age, 2. Make sure the other puppy has a good temperament, 3. MAKE SURE THE SITE IS CLEAN!! The last thing you want is to bring something like Parvo home with you. You could have the play date at your house, but you need to make sure the other pup doesn't bring anything in.


*NOW FOR THE MOST IMPORTANT THING:

One of the best things you can do for your pup, when it comes to bad habits, is to be CONSISTENT! These puppies are very smart and learn very quickly at a young age. It is often harder to train ourselves than it is to train our pups :)


Let us know what Tips and Tricks you have for overcoming this and any other undesirable behaviors.







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This is from a qualified Trainer and we thought it a great letter to put here. We're not trying to scare anyone off, but we desperately want you and pup to be happy!!


If You’re Not Willing To Train Your New Puppy, Do It A Favor, DON'T GET IT!!!


Every week I get no less than two phone calls from people wanting us to re-home their dog because they can’t control it. That cute little fuzzy puppy that you bought last spring is now 100 pounds of “I’ll do whatever I want”.

The time to solve a problem is before it becomes a problem. The training should start before you even decide to get the puppy or dog. Yes you read that right! Before you ever make the decision to get a new pet you should write out a list of rules, and accomplishments that you want with your new pet.

Take the time to figure out exactly how you want your adult dog to behave. If you won’t want that 100 pound adult dog sleeping on the couch, then don’t let the fuzzy little 10 pound puppy get on the furniture. All adult dog rules should be enforced from day one of bringing the puppy home. If you allow it now, you can’t change your mind later on.

Make an inventory list of your lifestyle. If you want a dog that will go hiking and jogging with you, don’t get a Newfoundland. They are extremely lazy. If you want a dog that will lay on the couch and watch TV with you every evening , don’t get a Border Collie. They need an extremely athletic lifestyle. If you're a 90 pound person, maybe a Saint Bernard isn’t your best choice. If you love having parties and lots of people coming to your house, maybe a protective breed of dog will not be a very good fit.


Extensive Breed Research should be your very first step in making this decision. While this does not ring true on every single dog, it will give you a very good idea of how your future dog will be. Consider how this dog will be involved in your life. Read the breed description and then consider how well this breed fits in your lifestyle. If the breed description describes a dog that wouldn’t be a PERFECT fit, then you should pick a different breed.

Now take the time to figure out if you have the patience, time and dedication to deal with raising a puppy. An 8 week old puppy will need to be potty trained. This is going to involve taking it outside every waking hour. If you're not home 24/7, it will also involve cleaning it’s crate and giving it a bath multiple times per day. You’re also going to have to deal with other puppy issues like chewing on furniture and other household items. Teaching the puppy that you're not a chew toy. If you can’t deal with all these things, then maybe you should consider getting an adult dog.

Adult dogs also come with problems. You more than likely won’t know how the dog was raised, what bad habits, health or temperament issues it has. You won’t know if the dog was ever abused. Abuse & bad training techniques can be a nightmare to resolve.

Teaching is ALWAYS easier than correcting. There is nothing funnier than that cute little puppy growling and attacking your hand as you fight with it when you first bring it home. But in a few weeks when your arms look like hamburger and you can’t walk across the living room without him/her latching onto your foot it won’t be so fun. So don’t allow it from day one.

When it’s 3 months out and barking and growling at strangers when you're going for a walk it is absolutely hilarious. But when he is full grown and is lunging at the end of his leash as a child walks past, it’s not so funny. So don’t allow it from day one.

Can you financially afford to own a dog? The initial purchase cost is just a small fraction of the expenses that will need to be covered. Shots, medical bills, grooming, boarding during vacation, feed, leashes all of these add up. If your dog gets seriously ill or injured, Vet bills can run into the thousands. Are you qualified to train your dog? If not you will need to seek the assistance of a qualified trainer.


George Walker Walker’s K9 Services




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Perfection - in baby steps... I think one of the things that a lot of people and breeders in particular struggle with is the perceived need to do things perfectly. Perfect test scores, perfect coloration, perfect temperament, perfectly trained. It can get to be overwhelming. Honestly, perfection paralysis is a real thing, and so are the feelings of inadequacy we confront ourselves with on a daily basis.


In the world of breeding, this concept is reinforced by so many breeders absolutely being ruthless with each other trying to prove the other is not being responsible. Everyone knows that there are very real and unethically operating puppy mills, places with awful conditions. We all need to unite against breeding done this way. It is such a powerful wrong in the world that breeders and anti-breeders alike feel so free to throw words around to their fellow breeders and say someone else is doing it wrong when maybe it is only different. It is a very disheartening name-calling mess. Please don't confuse being responsible with doing things the way they have traditionally been done. I personally like to occasionally ask myself "but why do we do it that way?" That doesn't make me ignorant and unethical, it makes me an innovator.


I recently read the book This Could Be Our Future A MANIFESTO FOR A MORE GENEROUS WORLD

By YANCEY STRICKLER he talks about examining the hidden defaults, the why behind the what that you do. It was very empowering. It made me re-think my very concept as a human. I felt able to change so many things for the better because of that, but just one at a time.



What are the traditional "this is how things are done" rules have you been following without knowing why? I think that it can be proposed that some of the testing standards breeders set for themselves and others are contributing to the lack of diversity in dogs. In fact, geneticists at embark and other places have said that very thing. My Mom called that 'throwing the baby out with the bathwater".


The following sounds crazy and is said a bit tongue-in-cheek, but do we actually need to thank the "backyard breeders" for maintaining some diversity when "strict standards" purebred breeders were discarding too many animals and causing bottlenecks in the gene pool? What does it mean to be a "preservation breeder"? Do we need to redefine the terminology?


I recently joined a group called the functional dog collaborative who discuss some of the structural and temperamental whys in the breeding of pet and working dogs. I have explored concepts to help me to improve my breeding focus and program. They are open as a group for the creation of new breeds to meet the requirements for the pet dogs of today.


People come in all different shapes, sizes, colors, genders, and motivations, it is ok that our pets do the same. There is absolutely no one size fits all pet dog. I feel perfectly justified in breeding healthy, diverse, family pets that will be described as "the best dog we ever had" even though I have been called many names because of it I am convinced that this is really necessary as the way we live, work, and interact with our fellow humans' changes and evolves in society today.


Striving for perfection is a struggle in the breeding world but also in all of the things we do.

Am I doing enough as a parent?

Does my front yard represent what my values are?

How can I beat myself up today?

Start by being kind to yourself, I promise you if you put your heart into the things you do, and even take baby steps at improving and getting where you want it will make an incredible difference in your life.


Don't compare yourself to others, compare yourself to your yesterday self, and just do a little better. Don't get stuck behind the roadblock you made for yourself. Make a better future for yourself.


What are some of the baby steps you want to take in your life?

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